4/25/2016

Renaissance


The announcement reads, “Friends and family are invited to a celebration of Dave’s life.” His was a life worth celebrating. It is his early death that they mourn.

Echoes of his laughter are caught like dust motes in the kaleidoscope of winter sunbeams slanting through stained glass windows and warming those crowded into the little chapel. One by one, they step to the altar, cast off their wrappings of grief, and share the memories of his escapades they carry within. When the last laugh fades, his son and his family stand and move to the large marble font at the rear of the nave. The minister annoints his grandchild, and Dave’s spirit is reborn.

petals drop, decay
fertilizing future life
winter unto spring




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Photographer Susan Judd is sharing some of her lovely photographs at dVerse Poets Pub as inspiration for Haibun Monday: Beauty in Decay. For those of you (like me) unfamiliar with haibun, it is a Japanese form of poetry that combines prose with haiku.


28 comments:

  1. Patti, for being new to the form, you have captured it so well. That second paragraph for me was especially meaningful and poetic. Loved this:

    Echoes of his laughter are caught like dust motes in the kaleidoscope of winter sunbeams slanting through stained glass windows and warming those crowded into the little chapel.

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    1. Thank you, Victoria. Strange to say, but this memorial service was the most uplifting event you could imagine.

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  2. Perfect examples of capturing the cycles of passing and being born...beautiful imagery and meaning in the windows as well.

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  3. Beautifully expressed Patti, well done, lovely reflection.

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  4. "....cast off their wrappings of grief..." Ah but you've described with such careful detail, the funeral / celebration of life for a loved one. And how beautiful to have the baptism of the grandchild as a part of this celebration -- the cycle of life fulfilled. And your haiku is the perfect complement here.
    I am reminded of my father-in-law's funeral....there was a single rose on the altar. The tradition of the church (he was a lifelong member) was to place a red rose on the altar when a new child was born into the congregation. The funeral was in December -- and on that morning, his grand niece Joy was born.

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    1. Thank you for visiting and sharing the story of your father-in-law's funeral. Dave's funeral was so uplifting. The love and joy in that chapel made everyone feel hopeful.

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  5. That's a great story unraveling; the fading petals of a life past and the promise of new

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    1. Thanks for visiting, Mark, and for your kind words.

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  6. Love this, especially:
    "fertilizing future life
    winter unto spring"

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  7. It seems that these days memorial services have become more lighthearted gatherings where lives are being celebrated. Of course there is still mourning and feelings of loss but many times there are shared stories that bring laughter and cheer. I like that. And you did a wonderful job with the haibun not having been familiar with it. Perfect haiku too!
    Gayle ~

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    1. Thank you, Gayle. I really loved Dave's service. As sad as I was at losing a good friend, the service so perfectly captured his spirit, I left feeling uplifted.

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  8. Wow! A very moving story of the circle of life...and to read in your comments that this was an actual ceremony was so intriguing and beautiful.

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    1. Thank you. Yes, the service was for a friend, and was the most moving (in a good way) I've ever attended.

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  9. I have often found that funerals can be a moment of celebration also. A moment to remember the life and not the death. To let it be the theme of a the service seems so much better. I love how you described it, and using the light to show it.

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    1. I agree. Surely the deceased would want his or her life to be celebrated.

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  10. this is such a beautiful example of life and death under the same roof, part of the same cycle that brings as much joy as it does grief.

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  11. I just love these words: 'Echoes of his laughter are caught like dust motes in the kaleidoscope of winter sunbeams slanting through stained glass windows'!

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    1. That was my favorite line to write, Kim. I'm glad you liked it.

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  12. I loved the reversal of mood with the haiku. We should indeed celebrate the lives of those who leave us just as we celebrate the new arrivals.

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  13. Indeed uplifting to read a genuine response to a loved one's funeral.

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  14. I'd like to echo Kim's comment :) Fabulous haibun and celebration of a life well-lived!

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    1. Thank you for visiting, Lynn, and for your kind words. Dave did indeed have a life well-lived. He would really have enjoyed his memorial service.

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Thoughts? I would love to hear from you.